Shevlin vs. Glidden: A Brooklyn High School Hockey Rivalry

   Across the East River from Lower Manhattan, 1920s Brooklyn area high schools battled to dethrone Jamaica High School from nearly decade long rule in Boy’s ice hockey. Before NHL hockey settled into New York City, Brooklyn’s Public School hockey league experienced a brief revival under Vice-President Gustavus Kirby and Stanley Cup winning transplant from Winnipeg, Tom Howard.

   In the reinvigorated league, all top scorers were compared to Hubert, “Hubie” or “Hubey”, Baylis, captain of Jamaica’s 1925-26 team. In his senior season, Baylis scored 13 goals over 7 games. In the opening game, Baylis’ puck kissed the net four times against Boys High School on 17 December 1925. He provided more than a third of Jamaica’s 37 goals that season, which ensured they won the championship and the custom hockey sticks. In the 1927/28 season, two pucksters challenged Baylis’ 1.85 goals per game (gpg) achievement.

   Jamaica entrusted Harold Vincent Shevlin to maintain their hockey dominance. A second generation American of Irish and New York City Police Department (NYCPD) descent, Shevlin grew up in the family home in Jamaica, New York as the eighth child of elven. Shevlin’s hockey start was not as explosive as Baylis. Yet, Shevlin maintained consistency. In those first seven games, Shevlin scored 15 goals. Shevlin’s 2.14 gpg average outpaced Baylis. Shevlin eventually scored a four goal game which pushed him into the top scoring position. But, a rival puckster from Manual High School jostled with Shevlin for that position.

   Elwyn Augustus Glidden proved to be an excellent opponent to Shevlin. In the midst of the duel, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle provided insight into Glidden’s athletic talent.  Glidden transferred to Manual High School from Melrose, Massachusetts. Melrose High School players regularly made top marks in the tough Boston area high school league. Additionally, early American hockey pedigree, like Robert Paisley, and Clarence and Percy Wanamaker, learned the game on Melrose’s ice. Glidden’s four goal game came in the fifth against Franklin Lane. At the end of seven games, Glidden tallied 13 goals with a 1.85 gpg average. However, three games remained in the regular season.

At the end of six games, Glidden led the goal race by one, 12 to 11. After seven, Shevlin pushed forward to lead, 15 to 13. Suddenly, Shevlin’s scoring streak halted with just one goal in the final three games. Glidden maintained a steady pace with three goals in his final three games. At the end of the ten-game season, both tied with 16 goals apiece. Additionally, they fell short of Baylis’ 1.85 gpg with a 1.6 gpg. However, Jamaica advanced to the playoffs. Despite Glidden’s skill, Manual fell to a distant third behind Erasmus Hall. In the playoffs, Shevlin scored one goal in two games leaving the final tally 17 to 16.

  After their great exhibition on ice, they lived normal, unassuming lives. Glidden graduated from Manual the next year but did not play hockey. He bounced around the country until landing in Washington D.C. During WWII, Glidden worked for the Federal Works Progress Administration, the War Production Board, and the War Assets Administration. In 1947, he became an early employee of the Central Intelligence Agency. He died suddenly on assignment in Tokyo, Japan on 21 December 1948. Shevlin stayed true to family roots in Jamaica. He attended Ohio State University after graduating high school. He returned to join the NYCPD, 112th Precinct, Queens. Shevlin passed away in 1977. Just normal people doing extraordinary things.

The NAHL: Cornelius Fellowes Jr.

A rebellious Cornelius Fellowes Jr. hid an unrestrained private life within a very boisterous public life. Descendant from colonial family lines, Cornelius entered into his father’s business, horse racing, possibly more from envy than following tradition. When Cornelius Sr. found out about the marriage to Nathalie Rogers, Senior disinherited Junior and cut off all support. As if in an American fairy tale, Nathalie, and by extension Cornelius Jr., inherited a quarter of million dollars from a deceased uncle in Paris. The unreported marriage, disavowal and windfall  were just the start of Cornelius’ tumultuous adult life.

Cornelius Fellowes Jr. was born to a horse racing magnate in Brooklyn, 1879. Cornelius came into adulthood with a true love, news story that was more about the senior socialite than the son. Written as a socialite intrigue piece, Cornelius quietly eloped with Nathalie Rogers, the daughter of a Philadelphia merchant, “over a year ago” as of June 1900. Between a secretive marriage and possibly acquiring goods under false pretense, Senior disowned Cornelius in June 1900. Fortunately, the death of an uncle depraves Cornelius Senior from punishing his son. True love trumps over money and arranged marriage. But, this isn’t the end of this story.

The article hints at an indecent indiscretion of Young Fellowes. While only hinted at, Cornelius probably got married around 1895 or 1896 at the age of 16 or 17. Nathalie would have been approximately 14 or 15, and quite possibly with their first child, William Fellowes. Although 16 is too young for 1890s New York, it is the legal age for Pennsylvania. When the story was published, Cornelius fathered three children with Nathalie, William, Gertrude, and Celia. The lack of documentation and abbreviating his name for the 1905 census demonstrates Cornelius’ efforts to separate his private life from his public profile.

To reinforce the concept, Cornelius’ divorce and remarriage lacked documentation just like his marriage to Nathalie. When reporters inquired Mademoiselle (mlle) Dazie about her marriage, she remarked that friends knew, but was surprised that the news had not leaked out before. The article from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle posted in March 1914. Unlike with Nathalie, no records seem to exist that indicate children between Cornelius and Dazie. Until about 1920, reporters detailed Cornelius Fellowes’ bankruptcies, various dealings and even a suspicious death. Afterwards, the news seem to focus solely on his sporting enterprises. When he passes in August 1957, a small blurb in the New York Times reminds us of how he failed to secure  the great horse “Man o’ War” by a hundred dollars.

Despite all the high profile drama, Cornelius Fellowes Jr. played a significant role in the National Amateur Hockey League. For starters, he sponsored the Fellowes Challenge Cup. That cup symbolized the U.S. national amateur hockey champions until 1926. He managed the St. Nicholas Rink from 1905 until 1920. Additionally, he ran the Wanderers of New York. As a rink and team owner, he was a hand behind the professional as amateurs in that role. Between Cornelius, George Brown, and Roy Schooley, they would forge a hockey powerhouse that would carry to two Olympic silver medals and rival even the Canadian teams.

Research notes:
– Cornelius Fellowes was written as Col. Fellowes on  the 1905 New York Census and  Fellows in some U.S. Government documents and newspaper accounts
– Nathalie Rogers was written as Natalie in some U.S. Government documents and newspaper accounts
– Celia was also written as Consuelo on Census documents
– Mlle Dazie falls prey to the multitude of spellings.

Sources:
1. Ancestry.com. Colonial Families of the USA, 1607-1775 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.
2. The Evening World, New York, New York  09 Jun 1900, Sat  •  Page 5
3. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1905; Election District: A.D. 07 E.D. 37; City: Brooklyn; County: Kings; Page: 63. Courtesy of Ancestry.com
4. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle Brooklyn, New York 21 Mar 1914, Sat  •  Page 16
5. Brian McFarlane, Golden Oldies: Stories of Hockey’s Heros, 2015
6.
Cornelius Fellowes, Sportsman, 78, Dies; Lost Bid for Man o’ War by $100 in 1918. (1957). New York Times (1923-Current File), p. 15.

Interlude: Winnipeg’s Forgotten Hockey Royalty, heir apparent Thomas Henry Howard

Despite being a first son of hockey, Thomas Henry Howard left surprisingly few markers resulting in a confusing trail across the ledgers of history. Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, he really grew up in Brooklyn. As a result, Tom Jr. was actually more of Brooklynite than a Winnipegger. When Canadian and American WW1 demands threatened to ensnarl the Howards, Tom chose his fate by joining the United States Navy Reserve Force. While in the USNRF, Tom played hockey for Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. In all the numerous teams, leagues, and travel, Tom wins his own hockey championship in the California Cal-Pro league in 1930 with the Shell Oil Tigers. Unfortunately, few trail markers remain after 1930 until his death in 1971. Regardless of how his trail meandered, he exemplified, “Family above all.”

Tom Jr. was raised at the table of winter sports. Tom Sr. won the Stanley Cup and reinvented himself in New York and Pittsburgh. Kathleen taught skating in Winnipeg and New York. She possibly taught young Jack how to speed skate. Not to mention, Winnipeg newspaper noted her gracefulness at various winter galas of her youth. But, Tom Jr. seemed to desire a more subdued life.

In many respects, Tom’s father hints at managing his sons like hockey players. Tom Jr. appears to start referring during the 1912-1913 season. Then, Tom moves to playing in the 1913-1914 season. However, news coverage seems to increase when Jack matures into amateur hockey by 1916. At this time, everyone is reading about WWI, and the Howards are still Canadian and subjects of the King of England.

Looking at the available facts, Tom joined the USNRF in Newport, Rhode Island in part due to patriotic pride for the United States. Additionally, other reasons may have influenced Tom Jr’s and Jack’s decisions to join the USNRF. Regardless of the motivation, Tom played in the USN hockey league for the Newport (R.I.) and Charlestown (Boston) Navy Yards. The US Navy trained Tom to play with mines. Tom and his brother, Jack, was assigned to the U.S.S. Canandaigua. They possibly particpated in the North Sea mine barrage. Whether they went with the fleet, Tom referred a Brookleny high school hockey game on 11 Jan, 1919.

After the death of his brother Jack in Dec 1919, Tom moved to California and married Natalie Matthews. Listing a California home address, Tom Jr. continued to play for his father’s teams on the East Coast from 1920 until 1924. During the late-twenties, he played for a variety of teams until landing on the 1930 Shell Oil Tigers team. Under Ernie Miller, the Shell Oil Tigers team beat the Vancouver Ballards to secure the CalPro championship. In 1949, Los Angeles Monarchs honored Tom Howard Jr and four others for bringing hockey to California. All the while, Tom and Natalie ensured the care of their parents.

From census records, Natalie’s father and then Tom’s parents lived with them in California. Natalie’s father moved from New York to be recorded in a 1920 California Census. When the next census happened in 1930, Tom’s parents, Tom Sr. and Kathleen, had moved in. From all the travels between New York and California, Tom Jr. appears to have supported his family’s decisions and supported the decisions of the family he married. As a result, it appears that he believed in family above all else.

the 1949’s tribute is really the last easy marker that Tom and Natalie Howard leave. A phone book entry here or may be a property records there. Tom died in Denver, Co. in 1971 and Natalie died in June of 1986. They died childless. Thus, with their deaths, ended the line of hockey greats.

Sources:
1. Manitoba Vital Statistics Agency, Birth Record: 1894-002467, http://vitalstats.gov.mb.ca/Query.php, last accessed 12 Aug 2018
2. The New York Times, Sunday, January 26, 1913 pg 69, courtesy of newspapers.com
3. Hartford Courant Thursday, March 5, 1914 pg 16, courtesy of newspapers.com
4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Canandaigua_(ID-1694)
5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Sea_Mine_Barrage
6. Brooklyn Eagle, Saturday, January 11, 1919, pg 8, courtesy of newspapers.com
7. “California, County Marriages, 1850-1952,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K8FB-YBP : 8 December 2017), Thomas Henry Howard and Natalie Matthews, 19 May 1921; citing Los Angeles, California, United States, county courthouses, California; FHL microfilm 2,074,267.
8. San Bernardino County Sun (California), Wednesday, January 16, 1924, pg 9, courtesy of newspapers.com
9. Los Angeles Times, February 26, 1949, courtesy of ProQuest.
10. “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JTHC-HM7 : 19 May 2014), Thomas Howard, Nov 1977; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).
11. “United States Social Security Death Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J1B8-5YD : 20 May 2014), Natalie Howard, Mar 1987; citing U.S. Social Security Administration, Death Master File, database (Alexandria, Virginia: National Technical Information Service, ongoing).

Other Sources:

http://www.squareone.org/PolarPalace/palais.html

Interlude: Winnipeg’s Forgotten Hockey Royalty, “Young Prince” Jack

John Frederick Howard, born in Dec 1896, was probably too young to remember much about Winnipeg before the Howard’s moved to New York. However, Canada, and winter sports, never left him. He was the youngest child of hockey’s first royal family, after all.

John, often referred to as “Jack”, gained some minor fame for speed skating at St. Nicholas Rink in 1912. A competition of skill and speed between Jack and the Gerschel (or Gershel) brothers, Arthur and Stanley, from Public School 166. Unfortunately, Jack’s skating exploits don’t appear to make news until 1917. Jack may have gone to Public School 155 or 153 and Manual, now known as John Jay. So, more records may be available from “The Prospect”, Manual’s Yearbook.

In 1917, Jack joins “The Hockey Club” along with his older brother Tom Howard, Jr. The Hockey Club was one of the four amateur teams in New York’s Metropolitan League. The winner would face the winner of Boston’s amateur league. Ultimately, the Hockey Club lost the 1917 season with 2 Wins – 4 Losses. Jack played in four games with three goals and no penalty minutes. Penalties appears to be one area where Jack did not follow his brother.

After the fateful season for the Hockey Club, Jack participated in an event sponsored by the Canadian Club of New York. The event was a charity drive for the Lady Drummond Hospital fund for Canadian soldiers. Activities at the event included figure skating. But, the highlight was the hockey game between the All-Stars and the Crescent. The event took place on March 21, 1917, prior to the United States joining the war.  The entire Howard family participated in some way, and Jack’s role was Goal Umpire. The event netted $502.

By October 1917, Jack enlisted in the Navy Reserves along with his brother. They both played on the Newport Navy Yard team in the US Navy Hockey League (USNHL), which played with other amateur leagues with approval from the Amateur Athletic Union (A.A.U.). Because of the approval of the A.A.U., USNHL players had full amateur status like their Canadian cousins.

Retaining amateur status for amateur hockey players who enlisted caused much debate in Canada. Amateur hockey players, moreso than other amateur sportspeople, lead dual lives. They play hockey at night and work by day. However, that work can’t pay to play, like hockey stick endorsement. They can be hockey coaches and write books. Tom”Attie” Howard landed in some hot water with the A.A.U. over his stick endorsement. Additionally, amateur hockey was viewed as the future. In a way, maintaining status was critical. The ruling handed down as military (officer and enlisted) who were amateur hockey players were allowed to keep their amateur status.

By initial accounts, Jack’s time with Newport Naval Reserves  hockey team resulted in two games and six goals. However, this is not a complete picture of the 1918 season. Jack was involved in a brawl between Charleston Navy Yard and New York Wanders’ Bill McGill. Jack, like his father who also participated in the brawl, were spectators.

Jack tragecally died after a car accident in Dec 1919. He was riding on the toolbox of Tom’s car when it was hit. Jack got up after the accident but apparently had massive internal injuries. They buried him on Christmas Eve, 1919. Jack born a hockey player; died as an insurance rep.

It’s not clear, but Jack’s death likely had a significant impact on his family. Shortly after, Press coverage of the Howard’s drastically reduces even from “home town” papers like Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Tom Jr. moves to California. While Mrs. Howard vansishes from nearly eve. I’m sure that part of the reason was the changing nature of hockey from amateur to professional and seven to six man. 1919 marks a changing in old guard of hockey.

John's deathJohn’s death Mon, Dec 22, 1919 – Page 3 · The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) · Newspapers.com

*NOTE: Jack is a common nickname for John in the United States. Other famous John’s named Jack include John F. Kennedy (35th President), John Lemmon (Actor), and John Lambert (NFL).
*NOTE: John Jay High School on 7th Ave was dismantled in 2004.
*NOTE: The Canadian Club of New York merged with another Canadian Society. The merged entity is called the Canadian Association of New York.
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Interlude: Winnipeg’s Forgotten Hockey Royalty, “Queen” Kathleen Howard

While many aspects remain in mystery, Kathleen Howard’s advocacy for women’s hockey is unquestionable. Her abilities and circumstances paved a way for to become the United States first female hockey coach.

A Winnipeg native, she was born Kathleen Cronn or Crown in 1874. Prior to her marriage, she taught ice skating and participated in various Winnipeg Carnivals*. On May 13, 1893, she married Tom Howard, which started the “first family” of hockey. The family was complete with the birth of their two boys, Tom Jr. and John “Jack”. When they moved to Brooklyn in 1900, she brought hockey with her, and specifically for women.

Kathleen’s advocacy sprang to life in 1917 with the pronouncement, “Hockey for Women is not a Novelty.” While women played hockey in the United States during the “teens”, she noted that New York City women seemed to have forgotten about hockey. She also penned an article on women’s hockey for Spalding’s Official Ice Hockey Guide 1917, which Tom Howard edited.

Kathleen howard on hockey
Kathleen howard on hockey Thu, Feb 8, 1917 – Page 22 · The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York) · Newspapers.com

She coached St. Nick’s women’s teams for at least two seasons, 1916-17 and 1917-18. In the 1916-1917 season, she took over for her husband in December, 1916. In 1918, she arranged a charity hockey match with Boston to help the employees after the Brooklyn Ice Palace was ordered closed. Not to say that women’s hockey died after 1918. As a matter of fact, women’s hockey enjoyed great success through the 1920s and 1930s. However, Kathleen seems to drop out of the news after 1918.

Some of this may be due to imperfect records and inconsistent reporting. For example, Manitoba lists three birth certificates for two boys, 2 for Thomas and 1 for John. Each certificate has a different name including an incorrect last name, Cronner. The Winnipeg Tribune constantly reports her last name as “Cronn” whereas government records lists “Crown”. After getting married, she is almost exclusively referred to as “Mrs. Tom Howard” or a variation thereof. As a result, a shroud of mystery wraps Kathleen. In reality, the biggest reason is due to what happened to Jack in 1919.

Somewhere around 1927, She and Tom move to California to live with their son, Tom Jr. She outlived her husband, who dies in November 1945. However, her own death is as ellusive as her legacy.

Her greatest feat wasn’t getting married to a star hockey player and coach. It wasn’t raising two upcoming stars of the amateur hockey world. Her greatest feat was being the first woman to coach hockey in the United States, and quite possibly Canada, too. Of course, Kathleen may disagree and say that seeing women in professional hockey was her greatest legacy.

*Note: Carnival events included hockey, ice skating, curling, and dressing up. Kathleen was noted for her costumes in 1891 (gypsy queen) and 1892 (faerie).

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Interlude: Winnipeg’s Forgotten Hockey Royalty, “King” Attie Howard

By the end of 1930, Thomas Atcheson “Attie” Howard became one of hockey’s most important forgotten legends. During his time in the limelight, hockey drastically changed from a predominantly amateur sport to a self-sustaining professional entity. Additionally, game play drastically changed. Approved rule changes included multiple substitutions and reduction to six players on the ice. With such a storied life, a simple posting can only highlight a few major events and aspects of hockey’s King.

Thomas Howard was player, coach, and fan of hockey. Although Tom played in college, he is better known as a Winnipeg Victoria Forward. His playing career peaked with winning the Stanley Cup. Although seemingly acquired by St. Paul hockey club in 1899, Tom signed a contract to coach at Yale.

In 1900, Tom started his coaching career. In a professional capacity, Tom coached at Yale for ten years, Columbia University, Yale, Dean of Hockey at Jamaica High School,  and was possibly considered for the general manager role for the New York Americans. However, it appears Tom’s love was always amateur hockey and returned to coach the sport time and time again.

Tom wasn’t just a player. He wasn’t just a coach. He was a fan of the game, especially when his sons played. Both of his sons joined the Navy Reserve and played for the Boston Yard team. Well, an account of a game between The Wanderers (of New York) and the Boston Yard Team highlighted how hockey was a family affair, even if they were in the stands.

Hockey fights are family affairs for the HowardsHockey fights are family affairs for the Howards Tue, Feb 19, 1918 – Page 15 · New York Herald (New York, New York) · Newspapers.com

For each major change in hockey in the teens and twenties, people consulte Tom or his Almanac. Whether it was the transition from seven to six man squads or amateur over pros, newspapers sought Tom’s opinion. Additionally, Tom supported his wife as she coached the St. Nicholas Blues, a women’s hockey team.

Tom retires around 1927 and moves to Los Angeles with his son, Tom Jr. The last note in a long, storied life came from The Winnipeg Tribune:

Toms obitToms obit Fri, Nov 30, 1945 – Page 5 · The Winnipeg Tribune (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) · Newspapers.com

Tom’s Wife, Kathleen, lived on until 1967. Tom’s kids, well, more on them later because Tom’s story doesn’t end here.

Interlude: Winnipeg’s Forgotten Hockey Royalty, the Howards

Attempting to repeat 1895, the Winnipeg Jets are trying to upset strong favorites in order to win the 2018 Stanley Cup. In Dec 1895, the Winnipeg Victorias amateur hockey club bested Montreal to secure the cup with a team that became known as “the Winnipeg Seven”. While some fame befell the Winnipeg Seven, Thomas Acheson “Attie” Howard stands out due to his very publicized move to Yale. However, hockey was a family affair for the Howards.

While Thomas Howard’s journey started in 1871, not much was able to be discovered about his early years. Tom’s first appearance is an unassuming marriage announcement to Kathleen Cronn in the May 1893 edition of the Winnipeg Tribune. A couple of years later, Thomas Howard, Jr. came into the world in 1895. Finally, Jack T. Howard completed hockey’s royal family in 1897.

The list of Tom’s accomplishments only started with winning Lord Stanley’s “Challenge Cup” in Dec 1895. In 1899, Tom agreed to become Yale’s head coach of Men’s Ice Hockey. In the 20’s, he joined Spalding to sell sticks and become the editor of Spalding Official Ice Hockey Guide, an almanac on hockey and winter sports. By 1927, Tom and Kathleen retired to Tom Jr’s place in Los Angeles. A lone obituary in the Winnipeg Tribune on 30 Nov, 1945 noted the passing of Tom “Attie” Howard on the 18th. But, this wouldn’t be a story on family if it was only about Tom.

In New York City, Kathleen Howard came into her own as possibly hockey’s first female coach. Noted as “Mrs. Tom Howard” in most newspaper articles, she argued that hockey was for women. Mrs. Howard clearly coached the St. Nick’s Reds throughout the teens. It’s not clear when things changed.

In April 1918, Kathleen organized a hockey match between St. Nick’s and a Boston team with all proceeds going to the employees of the Brooklyn Ice Palace. The Brooklyn Ice Palace created ice using a mechanical process and ammonia. A State Ice Controller ordered the ice rink to close to save materials for the war effort. While the Brooklyn Ice Palace eventually reopened and the St. Nick’s Reds started playing again, Mrs. Howard seemed to fade into the background. She moved to California with her husband and passed away in 1954.

Newspapers gushed over Tom and Kathleen’s kids, Tom Jr. and Jack. From all accounts, Tom limited Junior’s playing due to a possible heart condition. When Tom Jr played, commentators praised his ability. Unfortunately, few articles mention Jack. One of Jack’s last mentions was in an article about how he and his brother played for a Boston amateur team in the mid-20s.

In the midst of the twenties, Tom Jr. married Natalie Matthews. They eventually move to Los Angeles, where they end up taking care of their parents. Tom H. Howard possibly passes away in the 60s, but Natalie lived until 92 (1987).

This only touched upon highlights of, possibly, the first royal family of hockey. Most amazingly is the story of Kathleen Howard. She brought the tradition of women’s hockey from Canada to New York City and Boston. She started a team and organized games. She, quite possibly, was the first female hockey coach in the United States.

Unfortunately, deep mysteries abound. What happened to Jack/John T Howard after Boston? Did Tom Jr. and Natalie have children? For now, the Winnipeg Jets have a chance again to go for the Cup, and recreate the magic of the 1895 Winnipeg Victorias.